How Race and Language Affect Degree of Nervousness and Impression of Others for Japanese College Students

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Eriko Sugimori
Oliver Benjamin Karp
Naomi Klingelmeyer
Tomoya Kita
Yuki Aoyama

Abstract

This study examined the influences of a person’s race and language on the degree of tension and impression of the other person among Japanese college students who are Japanese nationals and of a single Asian race. We asked participants to watch a woman (Asian or Black) in virtual reality introduce herself (in Japanese or English), then introduce themselves to her using the same language. The subjective evaluation revealed the following: First, Black women were significantly more likely than Asian women to be rated “would be a good friend.” Second, participants were likely to feel more nervous when introducing themselves in English to Asian women than Black women. Physiological parameters such as pulse rate and perspiration indicated that participants were more nervous when speaking English to Asian women. The results suggest that people converse more comfortably to people of a different race than their own while speaking in a non-native language.

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How to Cite
Sugimori, E., Karp, O. B., Klingelmeyer, N., Kita, T., & Aoyama, Y. (2024). How Race and Language Affect Degree of Nervousness and Impression of Others for Japanese College Students. International Journal for Educational Media and Technology, 17(2). Retrieved from https://ijemt.org/index.php/journal/article/view/293
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Original Papers